Physicals

Service:

This Diagnostic is Offered At

Our executive and comprehensive physicals are designed allow you to take charge of your health. Although early detection often leads to better outcomes, practicing preventive medicine can be challenging when it means multiple exams and visits. The physical focuses on quality preventive care in a streamlined and efficient manner.

A Two-Session Appointment Does It All

Your time is valuable, so we are pleased to offer our comprehensive physical in just two efficient appointments. The first session consists of examinations and tests. The second session, which can be scheduled within 24 hours, is a private consultation with your physician and registered nurse to review your results and personalized recommendations. Please allow two hours per session.

We Create a Physical Customized for You

A registered nurse specializing in health physicals will arrange your appointment and make certain the tests you select are best for you, depending on your age, gender, health status and personal preferences. We will mail you a packet with specific instructions on what to wear and what to eat the day of the physical. Catering to busy people is our business, that is why we go the extra mile to accommodate your requests. If you have any questions, our nurse will gladly answer them for you.

Core Components

  • Blood chemistry and lipids – Complete blood count, electrolytes, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL and ratios.
  • Body fat testing – Electrical impedance (resistance and reactance) measurement of lean muscle, fat mass and water.
  • Colon cancer screening – Tests for evidence of blood in the stool.
  • Complete physical – Head-to-toe physical by a board-certified Physician.
  • Comprehensive report – Medical tests, evaluations and recommendations are summarized in your Personal Health Profile book.
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG) – Picture of the electrical activity of the heart.
  • Exercise and diet prescription – Registered nurse reviews current activity and diet and offers suggestions for improvement.
  • Flexibility testing – Anthropometric tests of upper and lower body flexibility.
  • Hearing test – Tests for ability to perceive various frequencies in a soundproof booth.
  • Lifestyle counseling session – Consultation by a physician and registered nurse focusing on ways to improve your overall health.
  • Lung function test – Measures lung capacity and signs of obstruction.
  • Medical summary and physician letter – Medical results and a letter from your executive health physician summarizing findings.
  • Strength test – Measures strength of upper body major muscle groups.
  • Stress and tension profile – Self-administered psychological testing of lifestyle-related stress levels.
  • Thyroid blood test – Screens for thyroid abnormalities. Includes thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) test.
  • Urinalysis – complete microscopic examination for bacteria and abnormal cells.
  • Vision test – Acuity, peripheral, depth and color testing.

Customize your physical with additional tests

Our registered nurse can assist you in customizing your physical with options that complement your personal preferences and health needs. Our recommendations are based on age and gender guidelines established by the American Cancer Society, the American Heart Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The tests below can be added to the core physical.

For Ages 30-39

  • Bone density – Baseline, depending on medical and family history.
  • Chest X-ray – Only if indicated by medical history and exam findings. Front, back and side views of the chest. All X-rays are reviewed by a board-certified radiologist.
  • CT lung cancer screen – Annually for current or former smokers.
  • Mammogram – One between ages 35-39. Screening mammogram if no lumps or current breast problems. Diagnostic mammogram if breast lumps/mass or a history of breast cancer or breast augmentation.
  • Pelvic, breast exam and interpretation – Annually.
  • Treadmill stress test – Baseline at age 35 unless doctor advises otherwise. Treadmill may be recommended more frequently, depending on family and/or medical history.

For Ages 40-49

  • Bone density – Baseline, depending on medical and family history.
  • Chest X-ray – Only if indicated by medical history and exam findings. Front, back and side views of the chest. All X-rays are reviewed by a board-certified radiologist.
  • CT Angiogram – Baseline, depending on medical and family history.
  • CT lung cancer screen – Annually for current or former smokers.
  • Mammogram – Annually. Screening mammogram if no lumps or current breast problems. Diagnostic mammogram if breast lumps/mass or a history of breast cancer or breast augmentation.
  • Pelvic, breast exam and interpretation – Annually.
  • Prostate cancer screening (PSA) – Baseline/annually at 40 if family history of prostate cancer; annually after age 45. Blood test measures prostate antigen, an indicator of prostate cancer.
  • Treadmill stress test – Baseline at age 35 Every 2-5 years unless doctor advises otherwise.

Over 49

  • Bone density – Baseline, depending on medical and family history.
  • Chest X-ray – Only if indicated by medical history and exam findings. Front, back and side views of the chest. All X-rays are reviewed by a board-certified radiologist.
  • CT Angiogram – Baseline, depending on medical and family history.
  • CT lung cancer screen – Annually for current or former smokers.
  • Colonoscopy – Every 5 years. A colonoscopy is a test that allows the clinician to look at the interior lining of your large intestine through a thin, flexible viewing instrument called a colonoscope. A colonoscopy helps detect ulcers, polyps, tumors, and areas of inflammation or bleeding.
  • Mammogram – Annually. Screening mammogram if no lumps or current breast problems. Diagnostic mammogram if breast lumps/mass or a history of breast cancer or breast augmentation.
  • Pelvic, breast exam and interpretation – Annually.
  • Prostate cancer screening (PSA) – Annually after age 45. Blood test measures prostate antigen, an indicator of prostate cancer.
  • Treadmill stress test – Every 2 years unless doctor advises otherwise. Every 2-5 years unless doctor advises otherwise.
  • Tonometry – Every year that eye exam not done for glaucoma. Measures intraocular (inside the eye) pressure, an indicator for glaucoma.

Adult Immunizations

  • Boosters – Tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis (Tdap) measles/mumps/rubella (mmr).
  • International Travel – All vaccines, from Hepatitis A to Yellow Fever.
  • Miscellaneous – Flu, pneumovax.

Other Tests

  • HIV – Tests for HIV infection, which can lead to AIDS.
  • Homocysteine – High levels are thought to be an indicator of heart disease.
  • Lipoprotein (a) – Indicator of heart disease, independent of cholesterol levels.
  • Highly Sensitive C-Reactive Protein – High levels in the blood are a marker of risk for heart disease.